World Famous GRIMAL GROVE After 160mph Winds Video
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World Famous GRIMAL GROVE After 160mph Winds Video

This legendary tropical fruit property in the Florida Keys had a massive hurricane roll through 2 years ago, so everyone’s been wondering… How did this 60+-year-old Grimal Grove recover after another battling round of catastrophic winds? After Hurricane Irma’s colossal damage to Big Pine Key, the losses were extreme, our friend Patrick Garvey didn’t give…

Sabal Palmetto or Cabbage Palm

The sabal palm, or cabbage palm, is native to Florida and coastal regions of North and South Carolina and Georgia, and is the state tree of both South Carolina and Florida. The name “cabbage palm” comes from its edible immature leaves, or “heart,” which has a cabbage-like flavor. Sabal palms have curved, costapalmate, fan-shaped leaves…

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Mangrove Black – White – Red – the Protector of Our Florida Keys Coastlines

The Mangrove is a shrub or small tree that grows in coastal saline or brackish water. The term is also used for tropical coastal vegetation consisting of such species. Mangroves occur worldwide in the tropics and subtropics, mainly between latitudes 25° N and 25° S. Mangrove are salt-tolerant trees, also called halophytes, and are adapted to live in harsh coastal conditions. They contain a complex salt filtration system and…

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American Beautyberry – Callicarpa americana a Florida Keys Favorite

Beautyberry a rapidly-growing North American native forms a rather loosely-arranged, rounded shrub, five to eight feet tall and equally wide (Fig. 1). Branches form long arches bending toward the ground and lend almost a weeping habit to older, established shrubs. The coarse, fuzzy, light green, deciduous leaves are combined with small, lavender-pink blossoms densely clustered…

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Monroe County Master Gardeners – 13 Plant Clinics April to June

The Monroe County Master Gardeners are holding 13 plant clinics at three locations this spring to help you with plant problems or insect identification. The Master Gardeners are part of the University of Florida/ IFAS/Monroe County Extension Service. All of the following plant clinics run from 9 a.m. to noon. KEY WEST: Gato Building, 1100…

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Celebrate Sea Grapes – Beauty Nostalgia of Old South Florida

Visitors to the Florida Keys see them as robust shrubs and trees with large, round, fan-like leaves as big as your hand. They’re often seen in road medians, shopping center landscapes and impeccably landscaped yards. To the locals, they’re useful hedges and screens in yards, as well as important in preventing sand dune erosion. Sea…

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Gumbo Limbo – Not a New Dance But Good for Native Landscaping

These days, most merry-go-round horses are made from molded fiberglass and plastic. However, in the days when they were carved from wood, most of them were made from gumbo limbo, Bursera simaruba. Gumbo limbo is one of the most recognizable trees in the tropical hardwood hammock of the Florida Keys. Its red, peeling bark has…

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Florida Keys Cacti – Barbed-Wire and Florida Semaphore Cactus

While many folks associate cactus with the sand and heat of a desert in the western part of the United States, South Florida and the Florida Keys are home to six species of native cacti. In this week’s edition of Nature’s Corner, we will introduce you to two native Florida Keys cacti: the barbed-wire cactus…

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Create an Oasis for Butterflies in Your Florida Keys Landscape

Most of us have heard the saying, “Build it and they will come.” Can we apply this to attracting butterflies? If so, what are we building? The answer to the first question is definitely yes. The answer to what we are building is a little more complicated. Before you create a butterfly garden you must…

Poisonwood: The Good The Bad and The Ugly

More than 150 native plants call the Florida Keys their home and a few people can identify all of them. However, the poisonwood tree – Metopium toxiferum – Common Names: Poison Wood, Poison Tree – related to Metopium brownei (also known as chechem, chechen, or black poisonwood – is one plant that everyone, both residents, and visitors, should learn to identify. “Why?” you ask….