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Florida Keys Divers Can Help Take a Bite Out of Lionfish

Florida Keys Divers can help preserve the Florida Keys’ native reef fish populations during the fun, socially distanced Reef Environmental Education Foundation 2020 Lionfish Derby. Scheduled Thursday through Sunday, Sept. 10-13, the derby challenges participants to capture and remove as many non-native lionfish as possible from Keys waters. This year, COVID-19 restrictions have forced organizers…

Lionfish Challenge

23,451 Invasive Lionfish Removed!Congratulations to this year’s Lionfish Challenge top prize winners:• Most lionfish removed recreational category:Ken Ayers, Lionfish King = 1,194 removed• Most lionfish removed commercial category:Joshua Livingston = 3,192.8 lbs. removed• Largest lionfish category:Ron Surrency, Duval County, 17.04 inches (433 mm)• Smallest lionfish category:Nikkie Cox, Franklin County, 1.45 inches (37 mm) How to…

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Invasive Venomous Lionfish Killing Atlantic Reefs – Please Eat It

What do you do with an invasive fish, covered from head to fin with venomous spines as sharp as hypodermic needles; a fish that can’t be caught with a rod or in a trawling net as it multiplies rapidly, deep in our oceans, flummoxing fishermen and scientists alike? Lionfish. Note: Venomous is not the same as…

4 Florida Keys Culinary Delights – Stone Crab – Pink Shrimp – Lionfish – Key Lime Pie

The indigenous cuisine of the 125-mile-long Florida Keys island chain is a rich melting pot of fresh boat-to-table seafood enhanced with the fresh tropical flavors of lime, coconut, mango and papaya. Four Florida Keys Culinary Delights can be considered signature treats that are best savored only in the Keys: stone crab, pink shrimp, lionfish and Key…

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Whopping 8,089 at Lionfish Removal off Pensacola

Successful is too small of a word to describe the second annual Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day Festival May 14-15. In Pensacola alone, 8,089 lionfish were removed in only two days at the Gulf Coast Lionfish Coalition Tournament. More than 7,000 people (more than double last year’s numbers) attended the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation…

Florida Keys Anglers Air Their Concerns to the FWC

Florida Keys [anglers] residents spoke out on dolphin fish harvests, lobster bully-netting, lionfish problems and grouper seasons when meeting with state fishery managers last summer. Wednesday in Panama City Beach, board members of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will consider whether to act on any of the concerns gathered at a statewide series…

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Meet the Man Behind the ZooKeeper Lionfish Capture Device

The device is called the Zoo-Keeper Lionfish Containment Unit, and word of mouth has turned it into a must-have Lionfish capture device for many recreational divers in the Caribbean and Florida. Sarasota entrepreneur Allie ElHage didn’t know anything about the lionfish until late 2011. Four years later, after designing a device that divers use to…

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Lionfish Legislation Introduced Into Florida Congress

(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto) Curt Clawson, R-Bonita Springs, has introduced a bill that would ban importing all 11 lionfish species, including the nine that have not been found in U.S. waters. The bill would not interfere with the selling of fish fillets, which encourages to help eliminate the fish in Florida waters. The bill was introduced last…

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Hunting Invasive Lionfish Help’s Protect Coral Reefs

As Eric Billips reaches the bottom of the reef, 90 feet down, he spots a cloud of minnows around a coral head, and as expected, finds half a dozen lionfish lurking nearby. They’re beautiful, hovering like little resplendent flowers. But they’re dangerous, housing 18 venomous spines that repel predators. Billips is able to spear three…

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Using Tech to Corral Florida’s Scary Invasive Species

This large Burmese python, weighing 162 pounds and more than 15 feet long at the time of its capture in 2009, was caught alive in Everglades National Park and was found to have eaten an American alligator that measured about 6 feet in length. University of Florida researchers in the photo: Michael Rochford is holding…

Lionfish – Beautiful – Destructive – Now Resorting to Cannibalism

Efforts to tame Florida’s invasive lionfish haven’t worked. Now these venomous fish are eating each other. Though it probably won’t reduce their numbers substantially. Watch divers and researchers fight the invasive lionfish in Florida’s coastal waters. By Katie Pyzyk, National Geographic PUBLISHED JULY 23, 2015 CONCH KEY, Florida—Fisherman Gary Nichols, who has been finding lionfish…

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The Best Florida Keys Lionfish Killers

By Kevin Wadlow Dropping 80 to 100 feet under the ocean surface to start her day’s work, Rachel Lynn Bowman often zeroes in on several invasive lionfish. “It’s a double-edged sword when we see a lot of them,” Bowman said Friday. “I know it’s going to be a good payday. Then I think: What…